Has Technology Gone Too Far?

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Has Technology Gone Too Far?

British scientist getting microchip implanted on left hand by surgeon.

British scientist getting microchip implanted on left hand by surgeon.

Paul Hughes [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

British scientist getting microchip implanted on left hand by surgeon.

Paul Hughes [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Paul Hughes [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

British scientist getting microchip implanted on left hand by surgeon.

Samantha Casarez, Journalist

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Many Australians have begun to get microchips implanted into their bodies. Although you may be thinking that it is for the purpose of control, it is actually for the purpose of convenience.

According to an Australian news website, news.com.au, “Shanti Korporaal, from Sydney, is at the centre of the phenomenon after having two implants inserted under her skin. Now she can get into work and her car without carrying a card or keys, and says her ultimate goal is to completely do away with her wallet and cards.” The process involves a minor surgery, a few injections, and an ultrasound to make sure it’s in the right place. It costs about $80-140 depending on the tech and doctors charge around $150 to insert it.

Despite the fact that it is growing in popularity, some people wouldn’t even dream of it. “I don’t like the idea of having a chip in me, it makes me feel a bit exposed,” says freshman Grace Dueñas. “I don’t want some foreign object in my body that has tech in it because I don’t know what else could be in there. I’d rather just be completely human,” says freshman Ruben Lopez. 

Freshman Rachel Ledezma says, “No, I would not want a microchip. I feel like technology is advancing too rapidly and that these microchips are absolutely useless. Everything that they would ‘help’ with, we could do ourselves. I think it is all a waste of time and money that we could be using for more useful things.”

What this technology would allow you to do right now is access your home, computer, motorcycle, etc. with just the wave of a hand. They’re working on being able to use it as a credit/debit card, to share your diet, exercise, and sleep information with your doctor, and even release medicine as needed/scheduled.

Although there may be some security concerns, the data is all encrypted. A quote from Amal Graafstra, a US implantable technology pioneer, on news.com.au, “I want to make sure that it’s treated as part of the body, like an organ.” It’ll be treated kind of like a pacemaker.

There is still research to be done to improve it, but many still cannot believe the progress they’ve made thus far.

Would you want a microchip implanted in you if cost wasn’t a factor?